About CUES

The Center for Urban and Environmental Solutions (CUES) is dedicated to helping communities and decision makers resolve urban and environmental issues through partnerships, education, and research throughout Florida and beyond. The Center works with policy-makers and the public in their pursuit of options for managing growth while preserving natural systems, promoting a strong economy and planning livable communities. Their broad constituency – consisting of local governments, state agencies, civic and business groups, academics, students, and professionals – supports, motivates, and benefits from the Center’s activities.

CUES is housed in the School of Urban & Regional Planning within the College of Design and Social Inquiry (CDSI). The Center works closely with undergraduate and graduate programs at CDSI and FAU’s School of Architecture, as well as with the Florida Center for Environmental Studies (CES) and other centers.

Areas of Strength

  • Urban and Regional Planning
  • Community Planning
  • Land Use Planning
  • Transportation Planning
  • Smart Growth & Sustainability
  • Resilience
  • Disasters and Emergency Preparedness
Learn more about our research >
Learn more about our community engagement >

History

CUES was established July I, 1972 by Dr. John M. DeGrove, under the original name of the Joint Center for Environmental and Urban Problems (Joint Center). The name was changed in 2002 to more accurately identify the shift of the Center from focusing on problems to implementable solutions. Read CUES’s Joint Center Summary Report 1983-1987

Elsevier’s TRD Journal announces new section on Disasters and Resilience

Elsevier announces the formation of a new section of the international journal Transportation Research D focusing on Disasters and Resilience. This section will be edited by Karl Kim (University of Hawaii), John Renne (Florida Atlantic University) and Brian Wolshon (Louisiana State University).

This section of Transportation Research D will build on the special capabilities and interests of transportation researchers, coming from multiple disciplines, worldwide, to address the critical ways in which transportation science and the supporting theories, methods, and tools can be applied to increase societal resilience against all hazards, both natural and man-made. In addition to the wide range of natural hazards including both geo-physical and hydro-meteorological, the section will also cover industrial accidents, cascading events (where one hazard such as an earthquake can trigger a release of toxins and harmful substances into the environment), and intentional acts of sabotage or terrorism. In each of these disasters and emergencies, transportation plays a significant role. Core concepts such as travel demand modeling, rare event forecasting, activity-based analyses, system performance monitoring, optimization across time and space, mode choice, network analysis, geospatial modeling, and many other methods are appropriate topics for this section.

Interested authors are encouraged to contact section editors or submit manuscripts through EVISE: https://www.evise.com/profile/#/TRD/login

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